Profiles in Recovery

Allison Hudson

After losing her younger brother to an overdose Allison Hudson knew she needed help with her addiction. While at a 28-day residential facility she was introduced to the 12 Step program. Today Hudson focuses on giving back to what saved her.

What saves Allison Hudson from herself? It’s people like her. Hudson says, “Talking to my sponsor or other people in recovery who can relate and make me feel like I’m not alone. I always gain experience, strength and hope from others in recovery and hearing their stories. “

Hudson hopes to help others with her blog, www.itsalushlife.com. “Allow your passion to become your purpose. I am passionate about writing, recovery and helping others find the freedom that it brings.”

Additionally, Hudson is helping other through Will’s Place, a recovery resource center and that provides help to both individuals and families whose lives have been affected by addiction. This 501c3 nonprofit is named after her brother, whose overdose pushed her to become sober. http://www.willsplacenc.org/

Day Job:
Founder/Director of Will’s Place Recovery Resource Center

What I lost to addiction:
I lost the ability to care or be present for anything that didn’t involve alcohol. I lost my self-worth to my addiction.

What worked for me:
I went to a 28-day residential treatment facility that introduced me to the 12 steps. I remain active in the program and rely heavily on prayer and being of service to others to keep me sane and sober today.

Best advice for newbies:
Just stick with it. It is going to suck but then it will get better. If recovery was easy, everyone would be sober. It isn’t easy but it’s worth it. Find people in recovery who have what you want with good sobriety and stick with them. Ask them how they did and take their lead. One day at a time is crucial—sometimes it’s one hour or ten minutes. Make a vision board. One side should be your life in active addiction. The other should show what you want for your life in recovery. It was amazing to see how different the sides were and watch everything come to fruition in recovery.

Advice to my younger self:
As soon as you start trying to control your drinking, you have lost control.

Rules I live by:
Do something every day that improves your mental, spiritual, and physical health.

What I value most in recovery:
My relationship with God and relationships with my family and friends. Waking up without hangovers and not wondering what I did the night before is pretty great too!

Proudest moment:
Opening Will’s Place—a 501c3 nonprofit I founded in memory of my brother who died in 2012 from an overdose. Will’s Place helps individuals and families whose lives have been affected by addiction.

Rock bottom moment:
I woke up 49 days after I lost my younger brother to an overdose and for the first time, I knew that I could not stop drinking on my own. I had blacked out at a birthday celebration to celebrate my brother’s life. I had promised myself for weeks that I wasn’t going to drink that day. I woke up the next day with no recollection of the celebration. It was then that the fear of staying the same was greater than the fear of change. I asked for help from my parents and checked into treatment 2 days later. I have been sober since.

On my bucket list:
Open a sober living facility.
Publish a memoir.
Find someone I want to share this wonderful life with.
Travel.

Favorite recovery quote:
“Loving ourselves through the process of owning our story is the bravest thing we’ll ever do.” Brene Brown

When cravings come:
I look for ways to help another alcoholic. I go to yoga. I exercise. I go to a meeting and call my sponsor. I pray and meditate. I read books on recovery. Usually, it’s a combination of them all.

On my schedule today:
I wake up and pray. I spend about 5 minutes with a daily devotional and set my mind and intention for the day. I work in the industry, so it always involves talking to other alcoholics and trying to help someone get into treatment. I practice yoga or exercise. Before bed I write out my daily inventory and send it to my sponsor for accountability. I pray and go to bed with a peaceful mind.

What I learned about myself:
I learned how to be comfortable in my own skin. I learned to love the person. I learned to process feelings and not drink over them. I learned to live life on life’s terms.

How I get through the holidays:
Boundaries and exit strategies. I check in with myself daily, especially through the holidays. I reserve additional time for meetings and recovery related activities. I don’t people please and I am honest with people around me.

I get inspired by:
Seeing people recover and live life out loud. It’s so inspiring to watch people transform from a hopeless state to living amazing, happy and free lives.

What saves me from myself:
People like me. Talking to my sponsor or other people in recovery who can relate and make me feel like I’m not alone. I always gain experience, strength and hope from others in recovery and hearing their stories.

On find purpose:
Allow your passion to become your purpose. I am passionate about writing, recovery and helping others find the freedom that it brings. I started my blog www.itsalushlife.com to give others hope.

SHed the Stigma:
If you’re a person in long-term recovery who wants to share your insights, please contact us at [email protected].

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