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Naloxone: Emergency Response for Opioid Overdose

Between 2015 and 2016 opioid overdose deaths rose 19 percent, jumping from 52,404 in 2015 to 59,000 in 2016. It is easy to feel helpless when facing such an overwhelming crisis, but there is some good news. Naloxone, a drug approved by the FDA in 1971 and added to the World Health Organization’s list of essential medications in 1983, is proving to be a life-saving weapon in the opioid crisis.

Naloxone blocks opioid receptors and can reverse an opioid overdose. It can be injected, but it is most commonly given in the form of a nasal spray.

Step by Step Naloxone Emergency Response for Opioid Overdose

Long used in hospital emergency rooms, there has been a push in recent years to make the drug more readily available amongst EMTs, police officers, and drug users and their family members. And in fact, from 1996 – 2014, everyday citizens using the drug helped reverse more than 25,000 overdoses.

Many overdose prevention programs distribute naloxone, but it is important that you know your city or town’s local laws on carrying the drug. If you do have access to naloxone, be sure to learn how to use it before you need it.

We’ve created the infographics below to help laypeople learn how to administer naloxone in an emergency:

Step by Step Naloxone Emergency Response for Opioid Overdose

Step by Step Naloxone Emergency Response for Opioid Overdose

**Please Note: We welcome the use of our infographics in online publications, articles, blog posts, etc. However, if you use any of the above infographics in your writing, we ask that you please cite drugrehab.org as the source of the material.


Learn more about Naloxone and its use in preventing opioid overdose.

Opioid Overdose Death Reduced by Education and Naloxone Overdose Prevention Rescue Kit

Naloxone Overdose Prevention Rescue Kit